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Thoughts on Open-World RPGs and the D&D Lineage

Open-world RPGs have never really been my thing, though it’s less about genre preference and more about circumstances. I was never much of a PC gamer when RPGs like Baldur’s Gate were around, and by the time similar games (such as The Elder Scrolls series) emerged on more powerful console hardware, I didn’t have any of those systems. But from a distance, I find the branching paths of Western RPGs and Japanese RPGs to be such a wonderful story of diverging Dungeons & Dragons lineages—namely how the former has taken more from the customization and self-insertion aspects of tabletop roleplaying in contrast to the latter and how the latter has went on to emphasize the narrative and storytelling components by way of old Western computer RPGs such as Wizardry.

It might be my ignorance and unfamiliarity at work, but I see expansive open-world RPGs as putting less emphasis on defining strong characters through which a story unfolds. More often than not, my impression is that they are about putting the player in the driver’s seat and trying to convey a virtual environment where they can do “whatever they want” within the boundaries of a game’s programming. Even if they have set things to do and accomplish, these games are meant to feel like your story.

That being said, plenty of JRPGs have user insert characters, including Dragon Quest and Pokemon have audience insert protagonists, and the latter even allows for heavier aesthetic customization now. However, I do feel that there is a more defined sense of a default look and feel to these generic JRPG player characters, and the result is that they also end up feeling like someone you’re observing from a distance—like you’re in a dream seeing yourself from a third-person perspective.  For me, personally, I’ve traditionally preferred that direction.

Of course, I’m making certain assumptions and generalizations when I define Western RPGs as more expansive and open-world, as even those words can change meaning and significance depending on what players are used to and how they perceive the importance of those qualities. For example, it’s interesting to me that the prevailing online opinion on Pokemon Black & White has changed so drastically in the ten years since its debut. 

Back when it first launched, the games were criticized as being too easy and hand-holdy—you always knew exactly where to go next. This was a far cry from the original Pokemon Red & Blue generation-1 games, which gave far fewer explanations and kind of left a lot of things ambiguous. But now, Black & White are touted as being one of the gold standards of Pokemon, and its descendants inferior for their perceived lack of strong and focused storytelling. Red & Blue, in turn, are seen as cumbersome relics that don’t do enough to guide players. It comes down to a generational divide, but even within the specific realm of Pokemon—hardly what you’d call a premiere example of open-world gameplay—this debate about the two Dungeons & Dragons lineages takes place.

I feel that the success of expansive open-world RPGs on an individual level comes down to whether or not the inevitably less defined bits of narrative that are a consequence of heavy personal customization and gameplay systems that encourage defining “your” story as opposed to following someone else’s. Both it and the JRPG style are capable of capturing people’s imaginations, but it’s what we want to do with our captive imaginations that highlights our differences.

This post is sponsored by Ogiue Maniax patron Johnny Trovato. You can request topics through the Patreon or by tipping $30 via ko-fi.

Creme de la Creme: Why Alcremie Should Be a Smash Bros. Character

With more Super Smash Bros. Ultimate DLC characters on the way (including but not limited to the last Fighters Pass entrant), I’m throwing my hat in the ring as to who I think would be the right Generation 8 Pokemon representative. While it’s a longshot for sure, I’m throwing my hat in the ring in favor of the Cream Pokemon, Alcremie.

There are three reasons I think Alcremie would be the ideal Pokemon Sword and Pokemon Shield character. First is Alcremie’s Gigantamax form. Second is that she already comes with a huge variety of colors to base costumes on. Third is the unique gameplay she would provide.

Gigantamax

The signature feature of the Galar region in Pokemon Sword and Shield is Dynamaxing, where Pokemon grow to massive size and gain all sorts of new abilities. A select few Pokemon have the ability to do a more advanced form of Dynamaxing called Gigantamaxing, and Alcremie is among those capable of the feat. Moreover, her Gigantamax form is visually striking, as she turns into a giant multi-tiered cake. It’s perfect for a Final Smash, especially with Gigantamax Alcremie’s signature move, G-Max Finale. It attacks and heals at the same time, and would likely be somewhat similar to Princess Peach’s Final Smash.

Color Palettes Galore

As of Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, each Smash character has eight costumes. For other Pokemon, there haven’t been many canon options for colors, resulting in things like purple Charizard and yellow Mewtwo. For Alcremie, however, this is anything but a problem. In Sword and Shield, Alcremie actually has dozens of possible physical variations based on the specific way it evolves from its previous form, Milcery. Rather than the developers having to work towards picking colors and trying to get approval, they can just say “let’s pick Matcha Cream and Rainbow Swirl” and call it a day, confident that the Pokemon Company won’t take issue.

Gameplay

For the most part, the Pokemon that appear in Smash Bros. are kind of similar. They have very animal-like appearances and their animations translate that aesthetic to their moves. But Alcremie is living whip cream who’s slow but with high special stats, and who specializes in support moves and fairy-type attacks. The closest we get to that is Jigglypuff, who only became a Fairy type in Pokemon X and Y. Alcremie could be a low mobility but high range character, hitting opponents with Dazzling Gleam while also using Decorate to provide support. If they wanted to take this further, developers could even make it a team specialist.

An Alternative 

In all likelihood, Alcremie could be too left-field even for Smash Bros. In that case, I think an almost equally good choice would be Grimmsnarl, who also has a cool Gigantamax form but unlike Alcremie has a more conventional body type. On top of that, Grimmsnarl is used by the ever-popular Sword/Shield character Marnie, giving it potentially a built-in fanbase.

The Cream of the Crop Always Rises to the Top

The DLC character of Super Smash Bros. Ultimate have mostly been third-party guests, but Pokemon Sword and Pokemon Shield are absolutely big deals in the video game landscape. Alcremie would be a quirky but appropriate mascot for the Galar region, and I think it would have both general appeal and the opportunity for some creative game design.

Now, if only they’d go back and give Generation 3 a proper representative as well…

 

Player Avatars No More: Pokémon Masters and the Granting of Personalities to Heroes Past

It’s a testament to the longevity and popularity of Pokémon and its characters that a game could come out where you collect not so much the Pokémon themselves, but their trainers. Whether it’s Sinnoh champion Cynthia or Pewter City Gym Leader Brock, the humans of the Pokemon world have garnered their own fanbases, and the mobile game Pokémon Masters takes advantage of this by bringing them all into one convenient place.

While I find the game itself fun, though not without its problems and quirks, I want to focus one one particular aspect of Pokémon Masters I find interesting. Specifically, it’s the ability to summon player characters from multiple generations of Pokémon as non-player characters that catches my attention because it means Pokémon Masters has to create personalities for them when they were previously empty shells.

Within the main games, only Red (the hero of the first generation) has made multiple appearances as a computer-controlled character, and his personality can be charitably described as “strong and silent.” The only thing he ever says in any game is “…” as a reference to that being the only thing you could say in link battles on the original Game Boy. After that, while certain characters may have had personalities established in adapted material like anime or manga, many liberties end up being taken that causes those narratives to differ significantly from the games. For example, in the anime, May (a character based on the female player character in the third generation games) is the daughter of the Gym Leader Norman. But in Pokémon Masters, it’s Brendan (the male player character) who is Norman’s child. While there’s nothing necessarily “canon” about Pokémon Masters, it still means the developers had to decide how these player avatars behave without a player.

As a result, fans of Pokémon may potentially view these old characters in a new light. Rosa, the heroine from the Gen-5 Pokémon Black 2/White 2, is expressive and quirky, garnering many fans in the process. Brendan appears eager and energetic. Kris, from Gen 2’s Pokémon Crystal, is kind yet feels she needs to improve. Without any real meat to go on, I have to wonder how the developers decided to give which traits to these old player characters. Will these become their established personalities moving forward in the games, or is it a one-off thing only for Pokémon Masters? Personally, my hope is that they end up sticking. The only question left is what’ll happen to the actual player characters of Pokémon Masters in the future—what qualities will the two of them have if/when they show up elsewhere?

Ash Ketchum and the Case of Filler Arc Character Growth

Ash Ketchum (Satoshi in Japan) is an ageless character. Whether it’s 1998 or 2017, Ash will always be 10 years old, will always be traveling with Pikachu, and will always be just not quite good enough to win a major championship. When he’s fighting through Kanto or Kalos, he won’t dominate the competition with his massively powerful Pikachu, and he’s perpetually more of a learner than a master in spite of his experience. It makes sense, because that’s how his character’s supposed to be. When he points his Pokedex at the same Pokemon for the 10th time in 10 years, it’s not because he’s supposed to be dumb but rather for the sake of a young audience who might be watching Pokemon for the first time.

Ash doesn’t always act as the impetuous rookie, and at times he’s allowed to shine as the battle-hardened veteran. Curiously, however, these mainly come when the Pokemon anime is not trying to go through its main narrative. During the filler arc that was the Orange Islands (taking place between the first and second generations of games), Ash was allowed to have a 6 on 6 battle and even defeat the Orange Islands champion. When Ash was participating in the Battle Frontier, post-game content within the context of the games, he would call upon his entire previous roster. The opening video during that arc reflected the full range of Ash’s experience by showing every Pokemon at his disposal (and even cameos by ones since released such as Butterfree). Ash eventually won the Battle Frontier, again showing how strong he was, but only within the between-games storylines.

Perhaps the biggest exception to this rule was when Ash finally got to face Gary in a full on 6-on-6 battle in the Johto League finals. The context behind this was that Gary’s Japanese actor was taking on less of a role in the series so they wanted him to go out with a bang and they succeeded. Just like his eventual Battle Frontier victory, Ash was allowed to show just how much he had learned over the years, at least for one climactic confrontation. It reminds me of how the Archie Sonic the Hedgehog comics kept running even during the years-long lull of no new Sonic games, and it was during those times that they dared to go as far as killing Dr. Robotnik. To a lesser extent, it makes me think of how during the infamous Naruto year-long filler arc, characters such as Hinata were allowed to get new techniques and grow more powerful.

I find Ash’s situation this interesting because it reflects both the realities of making an anime based on an wildly popular game and a desire to provide continuity or growth when the opportunity arises. Ash has to be eternally youthful, yet his viewers grow up and remember all of his adventures. The anime’s creators likely also have to mindful of the source material, especially as the series has grown to such international success (the earliest seasons played rather fast and loose with the rules).

What do you think of this balance? Do you wish Ash could be 20 years old by now, training atop a mountain like Red in Pokemon Gold, Silver, & Crystal?

Pokemon Sun & Moon: Why Ash Ketchum’s Design Was Updated…Again

In 2010, the Pokemon anime decided to spice things up a bit by modifying its character designs. More than a simple change of wardrobe, the denizens of the Pokemon TV world had changes to their faces and hair, and the result was an Ash with green eyes. With the release of Pokemon Sun & Moon, the characters have transformed once more, and this time it’s even more drastic than before. While it’s not like Ash is seven feet tall with a goatee now, it looks noticeably different compared to his adventures in the Kalos region. With such a major change, the inevitable question is “why?”

ash-sunmoon

Fortunately, I just so happen to have answered this question the last time around, and it turns out that the answer applies just as well, if not better.

At the time when green-eyed Ash was revealed, I wrote a post explaining how this was a clear attempt at making the characters in the Pokemon anime match more closely with the character designs of the games. The main artist for Pokemon has always been Ken Sugimori, and while the designs of the anime characters were based on his work back in the mid to late 90s, he’s continued to refine his art style over the years. If you look at Ash and other characters in Sun & Moon, they veer even closer to Sugimori’s current aesthetic. Characters appear rounder and softer, and the way their eyes are drawn have that distinct Sugimori look. This is probably most evident in the new Alola region characters, such as Lillie.

lillie-sunmoon

Anime Character Design

264px-sun_moon_lillie

Game Character Design

That explains a good chunk of why Ash’s adventures in Not-Hawaii look so far-removed from past generations of the anime, but another significant one is that a simpler art style means being easier to animate. That’s not to say that the old Pokemon anime styles were especially complex, but being softer and more simplified in this way means the animators can put more effort into making things move well instead of making sure each character has all of their necessary details.

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My Favorite RPGs

Compared to many of my friends over the years, I’ve barely grazed the surface of RPGs. I remember in high school listening to my friends debate Kefka vs. Sephiroth, then going online and seeing my internet acquaintances gush over Lunar: Silver Star Story. My experience with RPGs is but a fraction of others, but in my limited exposure I do have my favorites.

Honorable Mention 1:  Dragon Warrior

Dragon Warrior (aka Dragon Quest), one of the granddaddies of Japanese RPGs, does not hold up particularly well. It’s a pretty long and tedious game where most of your time is spent walking around leveling up. However, the first time that you see the Dragonlord reveal his true self, and the entire fight with his dragon form, is such a memorable experience for me. What stands out, and is kind of hard to convey in videos, is that whenever the Dragonlord attacked the screen would freeze temporarily (instead of shake as it normally would), making it feel as if his attacks were different and more powerful compared to his minions. You might notice that most of my subsequent entries have something to do with how much I like boss fights.

Honorable Mention 2: Pokemon

In actuality, Pokemon as a whole is one of my favorite game franchises ever. From the thrill of discovery to the depth of competitive battling, it’s been a part of me for a long time. However, in a way I think it overshadows other RPGs because of its prominence, so I’m leaving it off this list.

Final Fantasy IV (Final Fantasy II)

In terms of SNES RPGs, I find that Final Fantasy VI gets much more praise, but I find that my heart lies closer to Final Fantasy IV. The two moments that I think really define the game for me are when Cecil becomes a Paladin, and the final battle against Zeromus. The thing I love about Cecil as Paladin is the way that his transformation is reflected in the gameplay. When Cecil is a Dark Knight, his special technique is to shoot a destructive wave of energy, but when he’s a Paladin he runs to cover his allies and take the damage instead. As for Zeromus, while his appearance in the plot is kind of dumb as a last-minute final boss, the actual battle is wonderfully intense. You have to constantly keep pace with Zeromus’s devastating attacks while music very much befitting a final battle plays. I could actually just fight Zeromus over and over and be happy.

Fire Emblem GBA (aka Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword)

My early experience with Fire Emblem is something I assume to be fairly common. I first learned about the series through Super Smash Bros. Melee, and then got to play a game for the first time with the Game Boy Advance release—the first Fire Emblem game released in the US. I’d heard stories about how unforgiving the series and its infamous permanent deaths were, and while the game was noticeably difficult, it was the satisfaction of seeing my characters successfully take down army after army, and seeing their stories as they interact with each other, which makes it one of my favorites. By the time you reach the end and Lyn, Eliwood, and Hector are in command of their legendary weapons, it makes you feel as if you’ve earned all of this power through your hard work.

Lufia and the Fortress Doom/Lufia II: Rise of the Sinistrals

Known as the Estopolis series in Japan, Lufia and Lufia II are pretty by-the-numbers RPGs, but I find them to be so incredibly charming and impactful. In The Fortress of Doom, your very first battle takes place in the distant past, when you and your fully decked out team have to fight the biggest baddies in the world, the Sinistrals. After your victory, you move to the present and control the descendant of the hero Maxim (whom you had just been controlling in that climactic battle moments ago), as well as a mysterious girl named Lufia. Seeing the story come full circle as you learn about what happened in the decades between then and now is immensely satisfying. Lufia II is a more refined game and a prequel which goes more in depth about the life and times of Maxim, but it’s the combined package that make them forever memorable.

Dragon Quest VIII

In terms of just standard RPGs that don’t really mess with the formula, Dragon Quest VIII is one of the most refined games I’ve ever played. It never feels like a slog, and the narrative twists are small but powerful. What stands out to me above all else (aside from Jessica Albert <3) is a way a major plot point is hidden throughout your playthrough in a simple and subtle mechanic. When you fight the first boss, it shoots a wave of cursed energy at your party. While one character gets hit by it pretty regularly, it appears to keep missing the hero. It’s an easy detail to forget as you play through the game, but when you learn that he’s literally immune to curses because *SPOILERS*, it really speaks to how clever the game is.

Super Robot Wars R

Does this count? In any case, it’s my first Super Robot Wars game, and the one that introduced me to so many cool and interesting giant robot anime. Getting to see in detail the various attacks and quirks of classics such as Zambot 3, Voltes V, and Gear Fighter Dendoh was such a big step in my further appreciation of the giant robot genre. Fun fact: my Japanese was still really rudimentary at the time, so it took me 65% of my entire play-through to figure out how to dodge. Ha ha ha.

So those are my favorite RPGs. I think it’s kind of an eclectic yet somehow boring list, but it’s straight from the heart.

This post was sponsored by Johnny Trovato. If you’re interested in submitting topics for the blog, or just like my writing and want to support Ogiue Maniax, check out my Patreon.

Pokemon Go: Catching is a Dream, Evolution is a Bore

Pokemon Go is by far the most clear indicator of Pokemon‘s cultural impact in the United States. While there are plenty of other examples, from perpetually high sales numbers to the unprecedented Twitch Plays Pokemon, the way that Pokemon Go literally became an overnight sensation and has people of all ages running around their towns and cities trying to catch Pokemon takes the presence of the franchise to another level.

While I personally am not as obsessed with Pokemon as I was 14 years ago, I still find myself drawn to this new take on an old idea. What I’ve found is that the catching element has made me fall in love with Pokemon all over again, but the way that evolution works still leaves something to be desired.

Over the years, catching Pokemon in the main games has felt fun but also kind of like a chore, especially after playing them for so many years. However, I still remember what it was like to first venture into Viridian Forest in Pokemon Red, the first time I encountered Articuno in the Seafoam Islands, and just that overall sense of wonder when one unexpectedly comes across Pokemon. Even though all of the current species in Pokemon Go come from the classic 151, and so I’m more than familiar with all of them, I find myself getting excited over spotting a Jynx or running into a Squirtle. Even though the ARG elements of Pokemon Go don’t feel like a perfect immersion, they’re good enough.

Where I think the game falters is its current approach to evolving. Instead of leveling up or using stones or trading as one could in the first games, all evolution and strengthening of one’s Pokemon is done through collecting candies and stardust. All candies and stardust, in turn, are obtained by catching more of the same species. This makes it so that, while the catching mechanics are fun, I feel no sense of personal connection to the Pokemon I am catching because I cannot use them in anything other than gym battles. When I get a Pokemon to evolve, they do not feel like comrades with whom I have developed a bond over the course of an adventure, but rather just something I feed sweets without their participation.

Pokemon Go has only just come out, and in spite of its numerous bugs it’s still quite fun to play. This speaks well for the basic appeal of the game, and I think it won’t go away even as it eventually adds newer Pokemon. I just hope that the game will let me feel like the Pokemon I catch matter more than they do, and that I can share my victories, defeats, and growths as a trainer with them.

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#Pokemon20 and What I Miss Most from the Original Pokemon

articleImg_20th

Today marks the 20th anniversary of the Pokemon franchise, and I for one am happy to see one of my favorite video game franchises thrive and improve to this day. With each generation of games, Pokemon has expanded its world view by drawing inspiration from cultures around the globe, taken advantage of newer technologies that help to connect players, and have refined themselves to be fun, accessible, and even a bit challenging once the human element comes into play. Although I think the games have evolved for the better, however, there is a certain experience I miss from the earliest days of Pokemon.

To celebrate, Nintendo is releasing the original Pokemon Red, Blue, and Yellow on Virtual Console (Japan gets Green as well). Yet, having it on virtual console means that new (and old) players won’t have that feeling of being able to instantly recognize a fellow Pokemon player.

pokemonrby

I started with Pokemon Red myself. I would play everywhere while keeping an eye out for comrades. If I saw a bright red or blue cartridge sticking out the back of a Game Boy (often at this time the Game Boy Pocket), I would go up to them and ask if they wanted to trade or battle. The cartridges were beacons that drew Pokemon Trainers together, and sadly with the way that Nintendo’s portable devices have been designed over the past 15 years or so it’s not really possible anymore.

It’s not all Nintendo’s doing: I got older and I learned more and more about competitive Pokemon. I used to participate regularly on sites such as Smogon and its old school predecessor, Azure Heights. From there, I eventually became too aware of what it took to make a strong team. As time passed I found myself with less of a desire to create my perfect ideal team, leveled up to 100 with lots of synergy and strategy but also full of the Pokemon I like, and I stopped being eager to challenge people. Either that, or Stealth Rock is total BS and I wish it were removed from the game or was not so danged powerful (seriously!).

Maybe that’s the day this all changes. Maybe I can dive back into the intricacies of Pokemon. I mean, I do own a Pokemon XY 3DS so maybe I can use that as a calling card like the days of old. In the meantime, here’s a list of some of my favorite Pokemon blog posts throughout the years:

Shudou Takeshi, Pokemon, and Me

In Honor of Twitch Plays Pokemon Crystal

Random Thoughts on Twitch Plays Pokemon

A Form of Evolution Perhaps

The Beauty of Diantha

Pokemon Omega Ruby and My Fabulous Pageantry Adventure

Pokemon and Color

PS: Fun fact, I tried to find my original Pokemon Red…then remembered it got stolen out of my locker during gym class. Ah memories.

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My Shirona: Nendoroid Cynthia and the Sinnoh Champion’s Amazing Popularity

nendoroidcynthia-official_pose-closeup Merry Christmas from the Sinnoh Champion!

This year, I received from a very good friend of mine an awesome gift I wasn’t expecting at all: Nendoroid Cynthia! Also known as Shirona in Japan, as well as “the best Pokemon champion ever” by most fans of the franchise, her presence continues to be felt over 9 years after her debut in Pokemon Diamond & Pearl.

As you can see, Cynthia comes with one slightly bent leg and one bent arm so that you can faithfully recreate Cynthia’s pose from her official artwork. The attention to detail on this figure is so good…it comes with a second figure!

nendoroidcynthia-garchompfocus

I knew beforehand that Cynthia came with a Garchomp, but I didn’t realize how large it actually is relative to the Cynthia Nendoroid. It’s a crazy time we live in where the accessories for figures are at a higher quality than what official merchandise used to look like back in the late 90s for Pokemon.

nendoroidcynthia-sideview

Though I originally wanted to just show off Nendoroid Cynthia, I ended up also thinking about the fact that she got a Nendoroid figure in the first place. Consider this: Cynthia is only one of two Pokemon characters to get a Nendoroid in the first place. The other? That would be Red, the original protagonist of the Pokemon series.

That means, more than Misty, Brock, Lorelei, Lance, Flannery, Roxie, or any number of other characters, Cynthia is a fan favorite and flagship character. To a certain extent, given the excitement of battling her, the personality she shows throughout the games, and even her overall visual design, it’s not surprising that she is so beloved, but she seems to have some other “X Factor” that puts her over the top. In comparison, Diantha, the XY Champion, seems to get hardly any fanfare. Maybe it’s her amazing battle theme:

So do you think Cynthia’s popularity is justified? Is there any Pokemon character you’re dying to see as a Nendoroid? Just the fact that Nendoroid Pokemon characters are even a thing still amazes me.

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Pokemon Omega Ruby and My Fabulous Pageantry Adventure

I’ve been a fan of Pokemon since before I first picked up Pokemon Red all those years ago. Since then, I’ve made an effort to play at least one game from each generation of Pokemon games. While I don’t mind the repetitive aspects of the franchise, and I appreciate the changes they’ve made in terms of storytelling, multiplayer, and more, after 15 years of fighting gym leaders and saving the world I wanted to spice up my Pokemon experience.

Then I remembered this post I made back in 2010. The gist of it is that I always thought that the addition of Pokemon Contests was unfulfilled potential. While it’s presented in the anime as an alternative path for trainers who don’t care about Gym Leaders, in the games it always played second fiddle to the main path to the Elite Four. However, with the release of Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire last year, I decided it was the perfect opportunity to change my approach: I would become a Pokemon Coordinator.

Omega_Ruby_Alpha_Sapphire_Contest_May

I would also play in Japanese because the Pokemon games give you the option to choose now. “Why not?” I thought.

What would a “Contest Run” of Pokemon entail? Essentially, rather than my primary motivation being gym badges, I would instead value the earning of contest ribbons. While I would fight the Gym Leaders, foil Team Magma, and more, these would be more means to an end. Instead of caring about my Pokemon’s battle stats, I would mainly focus on their essential Contest qualities: Beauty, Toughness, Coolness, Cleverness, and Cuteness.

When Steven asked me if I was motivated to take on the gyms, I even answered, “No.” He seemed quite surprised!

One outcome of this path is that my Pokemon almost perpetually had impractical movesets, whether for single or multi-player. To give you an idea, here are a couple of my Pokemon towards the end:

277Swellow Albania the Swellow @Red Scarf
Coolness Champion
Aerial Ace
Fly
Brave Bird
Quick Attack

284MasquerainChiba Mamoru the Masquerain @Pink Scarf
Cuteness Champion
Bubble
Water Sport
Sweet Scent
Bug Buzz

Those aren’t just the movesets of someone who has no idea what they’re doing, they’re chosen so that each Pokemon has 3 moves according to their Contest specialty, (Bubble, Water Sport, and Sweet Scent are all “cute” moves in Pokemon Contests), and even their items, the scarves, boost a Contest quality but provide no benefit in battles. It really made me feel like I was grooming my Pokemon to have little to no practical skills, and that they could only survive in the lofty world of pageantry.

Of course, as it was a single player campaign I didn’t put in a Smogon level of research into all of this. I’m sure that any TRUE Contest aficionados could tear me a new one. I mean my management of berries and blocks (the things you feed to your Pokemon to improve their contest stats) was terrible!

Omega_Ruby_Alpha_Sapphire_Lisia

One cool new addition to Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire that made the Pokemon Contest path feel more significant was the introduction of a new character: a world-famous Contest Idol named Lisia (Lutia in Japanese). As the premiere Pokemon Coordinator and the one who sets you on your path to competing in Pokemon Contests, she becomes a motivating factor. Lisia was my goal, my aspiration, and the reason why I continued to make my Pokemon as clever and beautiful as possible. By the time I earned all 5 Master Rank contest ribbons and earned the chance to take on Lisia and her daunting Mega Altaria (Dragon Dance is amazing in Pokemon Contests), I had reached my own personal Pokemon League.

In the end, I became an overall Contest Master and even took on the Elite Four and Steven. Though I could also add “Pokemon Champion” to my list of achievements, in my heart it was more of a nice epilogue than the true climax of my journey.

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